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mp3 player type: c tune in
Artist:
Title: True Life/In Flames
Label: Dial Records
Genre: Deep House
Ordernumber: dialcd024
Format: CD
Releasedate: 2012-02-23
Price: 16.95 € (approx. 22.88 $)  nicht auf Bestand
  


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tracklisting
1. Chamber Two
2. On To The Next
3. Moments I
4. Diver
5. True Life / In Flames
6. Untitled Piano Take
7. You Are Everything
8. Dancer
9. Moments II


True Life/In Flames – Christian Naujoks' second album after his self-titled debut of 2009 – sounds seamless. All's quiet at the beginning, as it is at the end. There's a piano, played by Naujoks; there's the marimba of Martin Krause; and then Naujoks' voice – once, twice. This album could be designated as a suite with various movements – it's bracketed by the conspicuous reprise of its most songlike piece, 'Moments I' and 'Moments II', as well as by the economy of the unchanging instrumentation and the black and white cover photograph by Dirk Stewen that references the recording location: the Laeiszhalle of the Hamburg Philharmonic. Piano and marimba stand there on an almost cave-like stage, surrounded by music stands, microphones and stacked Egon Eiermann SE 68 SU chairs. A company of genuine instruments. Unlike Naujoks' debut, True Life/In Flames completely relinquishes the use of any sort of electronically generated sound. Instead, there is a consistent stylization of what one might call 'organic sound'. The figure of the bedroom producer is relieved here by that of the composer and pianist. A dense concert atmosphere sets the tone. Stringent seriality is somehow combined with that Romanticism of the minor key which one also finds in a certain corner (and a more popular one) of modern twentieth-century piano music; in the likes of Michael Nyman, Wim Mertens, Arvo Pärt and György Kurtág. Deep contemplation and solemn expression paired with intellectual clarity. Each note has weight, and every sound a purpose. As much as anything, though, the image evoked on Naujoks' stage here is that of an artist-persona creating from the depths of his own resources. The grand gesture and the chimera of the 'organic' – along with all the authenticity of the consumptive, burning, real life that's announced in the title – are performed as a reflexive volte. For this apparently seamless work, which sounds as though it were written by one and the same hand, actually incorporates the music of others. None of these references are made explicit though. Just as Naujoks avoids listing himself as composer in the credits (only taking responsibility for piano and vocals), not a single 'source' is cited by name. The result is an open music of the multiple; one that opens up the authentic towards the inauthentic to the same extent, conversely, that it is then capable of synthesizing it back into its own strong structure. And this primarily by virtue of the closed staging. Reading True Life/In Flames as a purely self-referential statement on questions of copyright and authenticity makes no sense without taking this second aspect into consideration: a composed piece performed with a live instrumentation and recorded on location in the Laeiszhalle under the auspices of Tobias Levin. It is through this double alienation, this stepping onto the boards of conventional classical music, that theory finds a quite peculiar path to a 'true' music of the second order. – Dominikus Müller

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